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Lesson Five

Welcome to lesson five of a five lesson series. Next in progression of your highschool, college and university learning experience should be asking where things are and how much things cost.

Asking where something is located

In this dialogue, we learn the important term ‘doko desu ka?’ meaning ‘where is it?’. Another interesting aspect of this dialogue is when the Mrs. Kurata says ‘hai’ that means ‘yes’ but in this case means ‘I understand’ in this context.

Dialogue 1:
Pope:
Kurata:
Pope:
Kurata:
Sumimasen. Sungurasu wa doku desu ka?
Hai, sungurasu wa ni kai desu.
A, sou desu ka. Arigatou gozaimasu.
Douitashimashite.
Pope:
Kurata:
Pope:
Kurata:
Excuse me. Where are the sunglasses?
Yes, they are on the second floor.
Oh, I see. Thank you.
You’re welcome.

Asking where someone’s home is

In this dialogue, we will focus on the posessive form of ‘no’. Anything that is put after ‘no’, in this case, ‘uchi’ meaning ‘house’, belongs to the subject; in this case, Mrs. Kurata.

Dialogue 2:
Pope:
Kurata:
Pope:
Kurata:
Kurata san no uchi wa doku desu ka?
Chofu desu.
Chotto tooi desu ne.
Ee.
Pope:
Kurata:
Pope:
Kurata:
Mrs. Kurata, where’s you house?
It’s Chofu.
That’s a bit far, isn’t it?
Yes.

Asking what’s available

In this dialogue, we will focus on ‘chotto…’. In Japanese, it’s impolite to refuse someone of something in a formal setting. To skirt around this conundrum the Japanese simply avoid it by not completing a negative sentence. We have a similar way of telling people no by saying, for example, ‘I’d love to help you, but…’.

Dialogue 3:
Kurata:
Pope:
Kurata:
Pope:
Kurata:
Pope:
Sumimasen. Sushi wa arimasu ka?
Sumimasen ga, chotto…
Ja, hanbaagaa wa arimasu ka?
Hai, arimasu.
Ja, hanbaagaa o onegai shimasu.
Hai, 320 en desu.
Kurata:
Pope:
Kurata:
Pope:
Kurata:
Pope:
Excuse me. Do you have sushi?
I’m sorry, but…
Then, do you have hamburgers?
Yes, we do.
Then, I would like a hamburger please.
Certainly. That’s 320 yen.

Asking how much something is

In this dialogue, we will focus on the all important ‘onegai shimasu’ meaning ‘please’. In front of the ‘onegaishimasu’ is the particle ‘o’. This is an honorific particle and thus further compliments the ‘o onegai shimasu’ meaning ‘please’.

Dialogue 4:
Pope:
Kurata:
Pope:
Kurata:
Pope:

Kurata:

Sumimasen. Chiizubaagaa wa arimasu ka?
Hai, arimasu.
Ikura desu ka.
430 en desu.
Jaa, chiizubaagaa to kouhii o onegai shimasu.
Arigatou gozaimasu. 580 en desu.
Pope:
Kurata:
Pope:
Kurata:
Pope:

Kurata:

Excuse me. Do you have cheeseburgers?
Yes, we do.
How much are they?
430 yen.
Well then, please give me a cheeseburger and a coffee.
Thank you. That will be 580 yen.

Ordering a meal

In this dialogue, we will focus on ‘ikaga desu ka’ meaning ‘would you like something to …’. Once again, you put this phrase after the subject followed by ‘wa’. In this case, ‘O nomimono wa’.

Dialogue 5:
Pope:
Kurata:
Pope:
Kurata:
Pope:
Kurata:
Pope:
Fisshubaagaa wa arimasu ka?
Hai, arimasu.
Ikura desu ka?
450 en desu.
Ja, fisshubaagaa o onegai shimasu.
O nomimono wa ikaga desu ka?
Iie, kekkou desu.
Pope:
Kurata:
Pope:
Kurata:
Pope:
Kurata:
Pope:
Do you have fishburgers?
Yes, we do.
How much are they?
They’re 450 yen.
Well then, I would like a fishburger please.
Would you like something to drink?
No, thank you.