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Lesson Two

Welcome to lesson two of a five lesson series. After introductions you should go straight into Japanese numbers and asking for time. You’ll also branch into learning how to ask what things are in Japanese.Objectives: Learning Japanese numbers, and asking for phone Japanese numbers, time, and what things are. There are two ways to say zero, four, seven and nine in Japanese. As you progress in Japanese you’ll learn which ways to use these different numbers.

Asking for someone’s phone number

“Hai, sou desu” means: “Yes, that’s right.” This expression is used a lot in Japan and is often made fun of in occidental countries because of its similar sound to asshole. A-so.

Dialogue 1:
Pope:
Kurata:
Pope:
Kurata:
Kurata san no denwa bangou wa?
090-5867-8954 desu.
090-5867-8954 desu ne.
Hai, sou desu.
Pope:
Kurata:
Pope:
Kurata:

Mr Pope, what is your telephone number?
It’s 090-5867-8954.
090-5867-8954, right?
Yes, that’s right.

Asking for a third party’s phone number

In this dialogue, when the person asking the question asks for clarification he recites it wrong and is corrected by the person giving the number.

Dialogue 2:
Pope:
Kurata:
Pope:
Kurata:
Kurata san no denwa bangou wa?
090-5867-8954 desu.
090-9867-8953 desu ne.
Iie, 090-5867-8954 desu.
Pope:
Kurata:
Pope:
Kurata:
What is Mrs. Kurata’s phone number?
It’s 090-5867-8954.
090-9867-8953, right?
No, it’s 090-5867-8954.

Asking what time it is

A good way to remember saying dou itashimashite is by remembering “Don’t touch my mustache”.

Dialogue 3:
Kurata:
Pope:
Kurata:
Pope:
Sumimasen. Ima nan ji desu ka?
Roku ji desu.
Arigatou gozaimasu.
Dou itashimashite.
Kurata:
Pope:
Kurata:
Pope:
Excuse me. What time is it now?
It’s nine o’clock.
Thank you very much.
You’re welcome

Asking about the time in other places

In English, we use the filler umm or ah to indicate that we are thinking. In Japanese they use eeto.

Dialogue 4:
Pope:
Kurata:
Pope:
Kurata:
Kairo wa ima nan ji desu ka?
Eeto, go ji desu.
Gozen go ji desu ka?
Hai, sou desu. Kairo wa ima asa desu.
Pope:
Kurata:
Pope:
Kurata:
What time is it in Cairo?
Um, five o’clock.
Five o’clock in the morning?
Yes, that’s right. It’s morning now in Cairo.

Asking when something takes place.

There is another way to say yes in Japanese. It’s a long slow ee. This may sound strange at first but it is used quite commonly in Japanese spoken language.

Dialogue 5:
Pope:
Kurata:
Pope:
Kurata:
Ima, nan ji desu ka?
Eeto, juu ji desu.
Miitingu no jikan desu ne.
Ee, sou desu ne.
Pope:
Kurata:
Pope:
Kurata:
What time is it now?
Um, it’s ten o’clock.
It’s time for the meeting, isn’t it?
Yes, that’s right.